​THE GREATER NEED

NATIVE REVISION IS A 501(C)3 NONPROFIT ORGANIZATION BASED IN DALLAS, TX. WE UTILIZE COMPETITIVE SPORT TO SUPPORT
AND CHALLENGE NATIVE AMERICAN STUDENT-ATHLETES. WE IDENTIFY AND RECOGNIZE THEIR VALUE AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS WHILE REVEALING A PATH TO SELF-RELIANCE AND SUCCESS THROUGH TRUST, TEAMWORK, MENTORING, EDUCATION, AND RELATIONSHIP BUILDING.

Believe it or not, the closest 3rd world area to the United States is your nearest Indian Reservation. The following is reprinted from Native American Youth 101.

Historical trauma, chronically underfunded federal programs, ineffective government policies, and failure to meet trust responsibilities to tribes have all contributed to negative health, education, and economic disparities in Indian Country relative to the general population.
•      In 2009, the poverty rate among Native Americans in 2009 was 23.6% and 32.4% of the under-18 AI/AN population lives in poverty.
•      The average AI/AN household income is $33,300, compared with the national average of $46,200.
•      According to statistics released by IHS in 2012, approximately 12% of AI/AN homes do not have safe water and or basic sanitation facilities, compared with 0.6% of non-Native homes reported in 2005.

Regrettably there’s more…

•      Native American youth between the ages of 12 and 20 years of age are 58 percent more likely to become crime victims than other minorities.
•      Alcohol related deaths among Native Americans ages 15-24 are also 17 times higher than the national average.
•      The suicide rate for Native American youth is three times the national average.
•      The dropout rate for Native American students is higher than any other ethnicity.
•      At nearly 17 percent, American Indians and Alaskan Natives have the highest age adjusted prevalence of diabetes among all U.S. and racial and ethnic groups. – American Diabetes Association
•      The overall prevalence of overweight (BMI > 85th percentile) American Indian children was 39 percent compared with 15 percent in NHANES II for all races combined. – AM Journal of Clinical Nutrition

​OUR MISSION

​The need for intervention at all levels is acute and painfully obvious. Native ReVision has set a goal to expose at-risk Native American and Indian Land kids to better ways of living and higher aspirations and goals than not dying of diabetes, suicide, or alcoholism.We promote a wellness program for the entire family thereby empowering the children to help guide their elders to a healthy way of living, thus honoring our traditional ways in this modern world.

Native ReVision is here to imbue our youth with the self-confidence and life skills to become effective Leaders in whatever life paths they choose. If you would like to join us in our efforts to empower Native Youth, please consider either a sponsorship or in-kind donation.

Native ReVision supports and guides at-risk Native American male students through athletic programs, annual events, and individual mentoring. We help these young men identify their unique talents and set goals to achieve their dreams. We encourage them to recognize and take advantage of life’s opportunities to overcome the odds and make a successful transition into an accomplished adulthood.

OUR PHILOSOPHY

​Athleticism and physical fitness have traditionally been an integral part of American Indian culture. Almost every report of a “first encounter” with the Native population by Europeans includes a description of the physical fitness and beauty of the people. Developing and maintaining excellent physical health and fitness was a time-honored core value among our people for thousands of years. We need to get back to that basic conviction in order to preserve our culture in the face of the massive onslaught of negative influences directed toward our children through mass media.

Both Teams 700×72 Native Americans face an uphill battle in the organized sports arena. Compared with other ethnicities, they are under-represented in high school, the NCAA and on professional sports teams in this country. Gifted Native American athletes must work extra hard to get noticed. The concept of standing out is at odds with their cultural principle of learning to function as a group. To succeed, these student athletes must be supported and encouraged to achieve as individuals while maintaining their commitment to their communities and teams. This commitment and achievement apply to academics as well – an area where many Native American students fall behind. Both the sports they love and the academic arena require practice, training, and study for these students to improve performance and perfect skills. Native ReVision recognizes this and is committed to providing support, encouragement, mentoring and focus to these students.